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SS Ayrfield – Floating Forest

Posted by on Sep 2, 2014 in Weird | Comments Off on SS Ayrfield – Floating Forest

Homebush Bay in Sydney is a must visit for all those who crazy ones who love those spooky structures. There are 4 main shipwrecks to be spotted in Homebush Bay. One such ship was the SS Ayrfield, a 1,140-tonne behemoth built in 1911 as a steam collier that was later used during WWII as a transport ship. In 1972 it was brought to Homebush Bay to be dismantled, but fate would decide differently.
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It’s now an impressive yet spooky sight with all the lush flora growing in its rusted hull. The fully-grown mangrove trees have earned this 1140 tonne ship the name of “Floating Forest”.
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All shipwrecks over 75 years old are automatically protected from disturbance by the State of NSW Heritage Act 1977 and the Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976. Any relics in NSW’s waterways over 50 years old are protected under the Heritage Act.
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As the forest has grown inside the SS Ayrfield, the bay is now a popular place for photographers who wish to capture the uncanny sight of this strangely beautiful relic of the bay’s industrial past, not to mention nature’s resiliency.
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It was built in the UK in 1911 and registered in Sydney in 1912. It was commissioned by the Commonwealth Government for the transportation of supplies to American troops stationed in the pacific regions during WWII. In 1951, it was sold to Miller Steamship Company Ltd and was renamed SS Ayrfield and operated as a collier between Newcastle and Sydney. By 1972, the hull had been broken up and ended up in Homebush Bay.
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Ayrfield Shine
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