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Weird

Papakolea, Green Sand Beach

Posted by on May 6, 2013 in Weird | Comments Off on Papakolea, Green Sand Beach

If you’re visiting the Big Island of Hawaii and looking for a unique experience, you may want to go to Papakolea, the green sand beach. The beach area itself is not very large, less than 200 yards wide. The green color comes from olivine crystals and even though there is some black sand mixed in, it primarily appears green in color. It is greatly appreciated if you resist the temptation to take a souvenir of green sand with you and instead just took a lot of pictures to spark your memories and to share the experience with others.
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Tanah Lot – Temple in the Ocean

Posted by on Oct 19, 2012 in Weird | 1 comment

Located on the beautiful fringes of Beraban, Tabanan Regency and Kediri and around thirty kilometers from Denpasar, one must visit this temple in Bali. One of the hotspots for tourists from all across the globe, the Tanah Lot temple in Bali offers the human eye a treat of the wonderful setting sun, every evening. This cultural attraction is among Bali’s most picturesque places ideal for exoticism and photography. When the sun is setting creating a the mixture of magenta and orange colors on the sky and the tide rises, the beauty of Tanah Lot is a very spectacular sight. Expedia offers great deals in hotels and flights to visit the Tanah Lot temple in Bali.

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Fascinating Strokkur

Posted by on Oct 2, 2012 in Weird | Comments Off on Fascinating Strokkur

Close to nature but rich with colorful culture too, Iceland is a unique place to spend a fascinating vacation. Icelanders are very welcoming people and always happy to share their beautiful country with visitors on Iceland vacations. And although the native language is Icelandic, almost everyone in Iceland also speaks fluent English, making it very easy for people on Iceland vacations to explore this magnificent country.

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Weird Artisan Fishing

Posted by on Mar 30, 2012 in Weird | Comments Off on Weird Artisan Fishing

Artisan fishing is a term used to describe small-scale low-technology commercial or subsistence fishing practices. The term particularly applies to coastal or island ethnic groups using traditional techniques such as rod and tackle, arrows and harpoons, throw nets and drag nets, and traditional fishing boats. It does not usually cover the concept of fishing for sport, and might be used when talking about the pressures between large-scale modern commercial fishing practises and traditional methods, or when aid programs are targeted specifically at fishing at or near subsistence levels.

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One of the most iconic scenes your bound to see in Sri Lanka is stilt fishing. Sri Lanka is unique for its Stilt Fishermen of its west coast – fishermen who sit on small benches on poles stuck into the water a few meters offshore and fish for small reef fish called ‘Bollu’ and ‘Koramburuwo’

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The fishermen sit on a cross bar called a petta tied to a vertical pole planted into the coral reef. They hold the stilt with one hand while fishing with a rod or line using the other. They’re hoping to catch koraburuwa and small bolla, which are stored in a plastic bag tied around their waist or the pole. The poles are 3-4 m long and driven about half a metre into the reef, so the fishermen sit at a height of about 2 m.

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They spend hours sitting on a thin plank, hoping to catch one or two fish about 5 cm-long, that they sell for about 2 cents each. The rough waves keep the big fish away, so they sometimes have to settle for te smallest catch. But it’s a small price to pay in order to preserve centuries-old traditions.

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Stilt fishing is a dying art that is threatened by the very fact that it is so unobtrusive and therefore extremely picturesque: tourists visiting the area get attracted by the sight of the stilt fishermen, stay close by, bathe in the sea, in short, do all the things the fishermen have been trying to avoid for decades – namely disturb the fish.

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Unique Orakei Korako Area

Posted by on Feb 12, 2012 in Weird | Comments Off on Unique Orakei Korako Area

Unique Orakei Korako Area

Orakei Korako is known as a extremely active geothermal region most significant for the group of fault-stepped sinter terraces, situated in a area north of Taupo on the banks of the Waikato River from the Taupo Volcanic area, New Zealand. It’s also referred to as “The Hidden Valley”.

see:   wikipedia.org

A couple of the world’s greatest geysers were perished through the lake: Minginui Geyser, that was once noticed erupting around ninety metres high, and also the Orakeikorako Geyser, of which on situation can erupt around fifty five metres, and as well gave the complete area it’s name.

A lowest terrace in Orakei Korako is definitely the jade-green Emerald Terrace, that is definitely the largest of this type in New Zealand. In maximum wet situations nearly twenty million litres of silica-enriched water daily might circulation across the terrace and directly into Lake Ohakuri.

A Emerald Terrace proceeds thirty-five metres in the lake. The elevated the Waikato River degree by eighteen metres at Orakei Korako, floods roughly 200 alkaline warm springs and also seventy geysers. Many of these energy functions even now release, with their existence visible as gas pockets rising in the vents in the lake bed.

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 Orakei Korako remains to be the biggest geyser area in New Zealand, with up to thirty five active geysers. A most well-known of these is definitely the Diamond Geyser, whose unstable eruptions may last through a few minutes to a lot of hours, ejecting boiling water up to 9 metres.

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 The 3 terraces over the lakeside Emerald Terrace are wonderful fault scarps created by a huge earthquake in 131 AD, at about the time when Lake Taupo was final erupting. They’re generally covered in warm water algae, or cyanobacteria, which generally develops on temperatures around 35-59 degrees Celsius, the shades determined by the types, with green, yellow and black the most typical.

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 The 3rd plus biggest wonderful fault scarp from the area is known as the Golden Fleece Terrace, that is 5 metres high and forty metres long, having a gorgeous white crystal-like sinter coating. In the base are many vents where geysers have come and gone around the years, with probably the most recent, Wairiri Geyser.

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 As well at Orakei Korako is a Ruatapu Cave, one from only two caves in the planet able to exist in a geothermal area. The cave stretches forty five metres, having a vertical fall of twenty three metres, to a shallow pool of clear, sulfate-rich, hot acid water.

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Beautiful Fishing Villages

Posted by on Jan 30, 2012 in Weird | Comments Off on Beautiful Fishing Villages

An fishing villages are a villages, typically placed near a fishing ground, with an economy supported catching fish and harvesting seafood. The continents and islands around the world own coastlines totalling around 356,000 kilometres. From Neolithic times, this coastlines, as well as the shorelines of inland lakes and the banks of rivers, have been punctuated with fishing villages. Most surviving fishing villages are traditional.
Coastal fishing villages are often somewhat isolated, and sited around a small natural harbour which provides safe haven for a village fleet of fishing boats. The village needs to provide a safe way of landing fish and securing boats when they are not in use. Fishing villages may operate from a beach, particularly around lakes. For example, around parts of Lake Malawi, each fishing village has its own beach.

source:  en.wikipedia.org

Traditional fishing boats evolve over time to meet the local conditions, such as the materials available locally for boat building, the type of sea conditions the boats will encounter, and the demands of the local fisheries.

Some villages move out onto the water itself, such as the floating fishing villages of Ha Long Bay in Vietnam, the stilt houses of Tai O built over tidal flats near Hong Kong, and the kelong found in waters off Malaysia, the Philippines and Indonesia. Other fishing villages are built on floating islands, such as the Phumdi on Loktak Lake in India, and the Uros on Lake Titicaca which borders Peru and Bolivia.

In less developed countries, some traditional fishing villages persist in ways that have changed little from earlier times. In more developed countries, traditional fishing villages are changing due to socioeconomic factors like industrial fishing and urbanization. Over time, some fishing villages outgrow their original function as artisanal fishing villages.

Destin on the coast of Florida, has evolved from an artisanal fishing village into a seaside resort dedicated to tourism with a large fishing fleet of recreational charter boats. The tourist appeal of fishing villages has become so big that the Korean government is purpose-building 48 fishing villages for their tourist drawing power. In 2004 China reported it had 8,048 fishing villages.

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