web analytics

Abandoned Loch Sloy Dam

Posted by on Nov 26, 2010 in Adventure | 1 comment

Abandoned Loch Sloy Dam

Hey guys this is what one reader of this blog sent me today, its an abandoned power plant or something, its located in UK I hope you will like photos. If someone know more about this place please be free to comment.

photo source: Flickr

A power station (also referred to as a generating station, power plant, or powerhouse) is an industrial facility for the generation of electric power.At the center of nearly all power stations is a generator, a rotating machine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy by creating relative motion between a magnetic field and a conductor. The energy source harnessed to turn the generator varies widely. It depends chiefly on which fuels are easily available and on the types of technology that the power company has access to.

The first power station was the Edison Electric Light Station, built at 57, Holborn Viaduct, which started operation in January 1882. This was an initiative of Thomas Edison that was organised and managed by his partner, Edward Johnson. A Babcock and Wilcox boiler powered a 125 horsepower steam engine that drove a 27 ton generator called Jumbo, after the celebrated elephant. This supplied electricity to premises in the area that could be reached through the culverts of the viaduct without digging up the road, which was the monopoly of the gas companies. The customers included the City Temple and the Old Bailey. Another important customer was the Telegraph Office of the General Post Office but this could not be reached though the culverts. Johnson arranged for the supply cable to be run overhead, via Holborn Tavern and Newgate.

The power station operator has several duties in the electrical generating facility. Operators are responsible for the safety of the work crews that frequently do repairs on the mechanical and electrical equipment. They maintain the equipment with periodic inspections and log temperatures, pressures and other important information at regular intervals. Operators are responsible for starting and stopping the generators depending on need. They are able to synchronize and adjust the voltage output of the added generation with the running electrical system without upsetting the system. They must know the electrical and mechanical systems in order to troubleshoot problems in the facility and add to the reliability of the facility. Operators must be able to respond to an emergency and know the procedures in place to deal with it.

All thermal power plants produce waste heat energy as a byproduct of the useful electrical energy produced. The amount of waste heat energy equals or exceeds the amount of electrical energy produced. Gas-fired power plants can achieve 50%* conversion efficiency while coal and oil plants achieve around 30-49%*. The waste heat produces a temperature rise in the atmosphere which is small compared to that of greenhouse-gas emissions from the same power plant. Natural draft wet cooling towers at many nuclear power plants and large fossil fuel fired power plants use large hyperbolic chimney-like structures (as seen in the image at the left) that release the waste heat to the ambient atmosphere by the evaporation of water.

Standing inside one of the huge alcoves in the dam. Any noise inside this created some nice echo’s.

The view from the dam of Glen Uglas, from where I had approached the loch. The river that runs out of Loch Sloy is called the Inveruglas Water.

The dam is 56 metres high and 357 metres long.

In areas with restricted water use a dry cooling tower or radiator, directly air cooled, may be necessary, since the cost or environmental consequences of obtaining make-up water for evaporative cooling would be prohibitive. These have lower efficiency and higher energy consumption in fans than a wet, evaporative cooling tower.

However, the mechanical induced-draft or forced-draft wet cooling towers in many large thermal power plants, nuclear power plants, fossil fired power plants, petroleum refineries, petrochemical plants, geothermal, biomass and waste to energy plants use fans to provide air movement upward through downcoming water and are not hyperbolic chimney-like structures. The induced or forced-draft cooling towers are typically rectangular, box-like structures filled with a material that enhances the contacting of the upflowing air and the downflowing water.

See more photos: Pyroninja

One Comment

  1. JUST BEEN TO THE LOCH SLOY DAM – GOOD TO SEE YOUR PICTURES (MANY RESEMBLE OURS!)
    – WE DIDN’T GO INSIDE THE BUILDINGS BUT WERE CURIOUS, SO GOOD TO SEE THE PHOTOS – HAD A GOOD TIME WITH THE ECHOS AND REVERBERATIONS, EXPERIMENTED BY STANDING IN DIFFERENT PLACES.